Discrimination and Retaliation

Last Tuesday, in Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals (with jurisdiction over the courts in Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin) became the first federal circuit to explicitly rule that sexual orientation is covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In so doing, the Seventh Circuit created a split with every other court of appeals that has addressed the issue to date, thereby teeing the issue up for a possible showdown in the US Supreme Court.

To read more, click here.

On January 31, President Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch from the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals to fill the Supreme Court seat previously held by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.  Judge Gorsuch is known as a conservative, a textualist, and a talented writer—much like Justice Scalia.  So, what effect would a Justice Gorsuch have on employers? Continue Reading What Does Gorsuch Supreme Court Nomination Mean for Employers?

While no one knows exactly how Donald Trump’s election as President will impact labor and employment laws in the country, it is a safe bet that there will be changes. Because Trump was virtually silent on the campaign trail regarding the specifics of any employment law policies, we are left to speculate on any upcoming changes.  We provide a brief overview of our best educated guesses on what changes could be in store given the election results.  Given Trump’s position on government enforcement and his pro-business stance, there is an expectation of changes to several employment-related laws. Continue Reading What Trump’s Election Means for Employment Laws

November 8 is shaping up to have one of the largest voter turnouts in history.  As such, Texas employers should ensure they comply with election voting laws as they relate to employees.  Chapter 276 of the Texas Election Code sets certain requirements for employers.  Below are some do’s and don’ts for employers with voting employees: Continue Reading Voting Laws – Do’s and Don’ts for Texas Employers

Internal pay audits are rarely enjoyable. Depending on the scope, these audits can be complex and require detailed analysis.  However, in the current legal climate, an internal audit can be extremely valuable and greatly reduce, or even eliminate, potential liability for wage and hour claims as well as pay equity claims.  As previously reported on this blog, increased scrutiny into pay equity discrimination, changes in EEO-1 reporting requirements, the Department of Labor’s joint employment efforts, and the updated FLSA exemption rules continue to place companies at greater risk of government audits, fines, and lawsuits.

Many employers may have already reviewed and updated their policies in anticipation of the changes to the “white collar” FLSA exemptions, which go into effect on December 1, 2016. But if your company has not yet done so, or to the extent you have not conducted a more comprehensive internal audit, your company should strongly consider doing so as soon as possible for several reasons. Continue Reading Don’t Wait! Now Is the Time to Conduct an Internal Wage & Hour Audit

Title VII and the Equal Pay Act expressly ban the unequal treatment and compensation of female employees. Yet pay inequity can creep in to even the most well-intentioned companies.  As a consequence, standards for evaluating pay practices are rapidly evolving in both the public and private sectors, and many companies are pledging to improve wage equality.  What’s more, with the EEOC now targeting equal pay discrimination, we are primed to see a wave of class action lawsuits that could cost companies millions in back pay and damages.  Is your company keeping up? Continue Reading Pay Equity: Everything Employers Need to Know

On July 14, 2016, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) unveiled its amended proposal to collect summary pay data from U.S. employers with 100 or more employees.  Under the proposed amendments, employers who already file an Employer Information Report (EEO-1) will be required to also report pay by gender, race, and ethnicity, across 12 pay bands, by March 31, 2018.  Covered employers should start considering now how to adjust their pay, collection, and reporting processes.

To learn more on the proposed regulation’s impact on employers, click here.

On May 16, 2016, the EEOC issued two final rules that describe how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) apply to corporate wellness programs offered by employers. These two rules address incentives that employers may offer, as well as related confidentiality issues. How healthy is your company’s wellness program in light of these new rules? Continue Reading Does Your Corporate Wellness Program Need a Check-Up: EEOC Issues Two New Final Rules

Texas Bar Today Top TenAt some point, an employer may face the unpleasant task of responding to an EEOC Notice of Charge of Discrimination from an employee or former employee. Until recently, however, a well-drafted position statement often could stop a discrimination charge in its tracks.  A new EEOC policy may change all that. Continue Reading EEOC to Release Employer Position Statements to All Claimants

Texas Bar Today Top Ten It’s a new year, and some of your employees may have resolved to lose weight, eat more healthfully, or even give up smoking in 2016. But employees aren’t the only ones interested in their own health and wellness.  Corporate wellness programs can be an effective way for employers to encourage healthy behavior from their workforce while saving costs on health care premiums.

Continue Reading Corporate Wellness Programs: How Far Can Employers Go to Make Employees Healthy?